August 22, 2014

ap-fashionmemories:

Graduate collection - Valeska Jasso Collado - University of Westminster - Inspired by Ettore Sottsass and Memphis Group

(Source: percevalties.com)

August 22, 2014
perfect

perfect

(Source: top-model)

August 21, 2014
zannagoldhawk:

Here is a terrible photo of my first attempt at Shrink Plastic today - it was just too much fun…. Going to make these little babies into brooches!! Super excited!

zannagoldhawk:

Here is a terrible photo of my first attempt at Shrink Plastic today - it was just too much fun…. Going to make these little babies into brooches!! Super excited!

(via stumbledonpluto)

August 21, 2014

biblipeacay:

Marine Atlas from sometime between the late 1820s & late 1840s by Mori Jiang Yuan Shou (I *think* it was a 1/2 Japanese, 1/2 Chinese teaching manual). The 82 page book features a large number of hand-painted watercolour sketches of marine animals and plants.

It is hosted by the Rare Books Database at the National Diet Library in Japan.

August 21, 2014
egosumdaniel-od:


Microraptor
Pigments decay over time — but if a fossil preserves the microscopic physical structures that generate iridescent color, its hues can be inferred after millions of years. Such was the case with Microraptor, which appears to have possessed dark, iridescent plumage. “I went with dark blue, like a grackle,” said Martyniuk.
Microraptor’s feathers also appear to have been adapted to flight, though its skeleton was not. “Feathers seem to be more malleable in terms of evolutionary selection,” he said. “It’s a creature that was just starting to adapt to living in trees or flying. The skeleton has yet to catch up with the feathers.”

From Matthew P. Martyniuk’s "A Field Guide to Mesozoic Birds and Other Winged Dinosaurs" - coming up on its second edition.

egosumdaniel-od:

Microraptor

Pigments decay over time — but if a fossil preserves the microscopic physical structures that generate iridescent color, its hues can be inferred after millions of years. Such was the case with Microraptor, which appears to have possessed dark, iridescent plumage. “I went with dark blue, like a grackle,” said Martyniuk.

Microraptor’s feathers also appear to have been adapted to flight, though its skeleton was not. “Feathers seem to be more malleable in terms of evolutionary selection,” he said. “It’s a creature that was just starting to adapt to living in trees or flying. The skeleton has yet to catch up with the feathers.”

From Matthew P. Martyniuk’s "A Field Guide to Mesozoic Birds and Other Winged Dinosaurs" - coming up on its second edition.

(Source: Wired)

August 21, 2014
egosumdaniel-od:

Feathered dinosaurs and early birds are a pet subject of mine. It really feeds my imagination to re-imagine these creatures I was fascinated with growing up as the closest relatives of modern birds. I never saw the curious blackbirds pecking for worms and crickets on the lawn in quite the same way again…
PLOS ONE is reporting the finding of a new exciting species of feathered dinosaur - Anzu wyliei. It’s notable for being the first Oviraptosaurian described in North America. The description is based on three well-preserved partial skeletons and it is presumed that Anzu was feathered based on findings from closely related Asian species. Find the reference to the original article at the bottom of this post.

While closely studying three fossil skeletons from museum collections a team of scientists from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the University of Utah, reached that “aha!” moment with the realization they had discovered a new bird-like dinosaur previously unknown to science. They named it Anzu wyliei, in part after a feathered demon from ancient Mesopotamian mythology.
An illustration of Anzu wyliei shows its long, slender ostrich-like neck and hind legs; unlike an ostrich, A. wyliei also had forelimbs that were tipped with large, sharp claws. The new species was identified by a team of Smithsonian scientists in collaboration with the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and University of Utah from three partial skeletons collected from the Hell Creek Formation, providing detailed evidence of North American oviraptorosaurs for the first time. (Illustration courtesy Bob Walters)
The discovery represents the first North American example of a species belonging to Oviraptorosauria, a group of dinosaurs mostly known from fossils found in Central and East Asia.

Lamanna, M., Sues, H., Schachner, E., & Lyson, T. (2014). A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America PLOS ONE, 9 (3) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092022

egosumdaniel-od:

Feathered dinosaurs and early birds are a pet subject of mine. It really feeds my imagination to re-imagine these creatures I was fascinated with growing up as the closest relatives of modern birds. I never saw the curious blackbirds pecking for worms and crickets on the lawn in quite the same way again…

PLOS ONE is reporting the finding of a new exciting species of feathered dinosaur - Anzu wyliei. It’s notable for being the first Oviraptosaurian described in North America. The description is based on three well-preserved partial skeletons and it is presumed that Anzu was feathered based on findings from closely related Asian species. Find the reference to the original article at the bottom of this post.

While closely studying three fossil skeletons from museum collections a team of scientists from the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the University of Utah, reached that “aha!” moment with the realization they had discovered a new bird-like dinosaur previously unknown to science. They named it Anzu wyliei, in part after a feathered demon from ancient Mesopotamian mythology.

An illustration of Anzu wyliei shows its long, slender ostrich-like neck and hind legs; unlike an ostrich, A. wyliei also had forelimbs that were tipped with large, sharp claws. The new species was identified by a team of Smithsonian scientists in collaboration with the Carnegie Museum of Natural History and University of Utah from three partial skeletons collected from the Hell Creek Formation, providing detailed evidence of North American oviraptorosaurs for the first time. (Illustration courtesy Bob Walters)

The discovery represents the first North American example of a species belonging to Oviraptorosauria, a group of dinosaurs mostly known from fossils found in Central and East Asia.

Lamanna, M., Sues, H., Schachner, E., & Lyson, T. (2014). A New Large-Bodied Oviraptorosaurian Theropod Dinosaur from the Latest Cretaceous of Western North America PLOS ONE, 9 (3) DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092022

(Source: smithsonianscience.org)

August 21, 2014
katie-scott:

Chephalopods, from Animalium

katie-scott:

Chephalopods, from Animalium

August 20, 2014
worlds fastest repeating bg tutorial

lack-lustin:

alexinglasses:

So make a new file in photoshop like this…

image

now create whatever it is that you want, make sure it’s centred in the square then duplicate the layer

image

now go to filter>other>offset 

image

set the offset to half of the width and height of the box and select the “Wrap around” thingy

save as a png and then apply as your background

image

bam

hope that was helpful!

OOHH

(Source: baebot, via stumbledonpluto)

August 20, 2014
edemoss:

Sketching frilled sharks.

edemoss:

Sketching frilled sharks.

(via scientificillustration)

August 20, 2014

(Source: the--pessimist, via stumbledonpluto)